List of 12 Top Purple Gemstones Used in Jewellery – Kaleidogems

Although purple has been a colour used in jewellery since ancient times, there aren’t many purple gemstones. Compared to other colours such as blue, red and green that have hundreds of gemstone varieties to choose from, the number of purple gemstones is quite small.

Purple is often connected to royalty and nobility, power and wealth. It is a luxurious colour and depicts prestige and class. Purple jewellery adds a touch of sophistication and elegance and is an eye-catching colour.

There are many varieties of purple including violet, lilac, lavender, mauve, mulberry and wine. To help you choose your stone and shade, here are our top 12 purple gemstones for jewellery.

1. Purple Diamonds

Features:

  • An exclusive gemstone
  • Extremely rare
  • Very expensive
  • Synthetic and enhanced varieties available

Purple diamonds are created when there is a high amount of hydrogen present during the diamond’s formation. These spectacular stones are very rare and expensive, especially if the stone is vivid and saturated in colour. However, enhanced or synthetic alternatives are relatively much more affordable.  Purple diamonds are known by a variety of nicknames, including Lilac, Orchid, Lavender, Grape and Plum Diamonds which describe the colour of the stone. High quality purple diamonds are generally sought after by collectors and diamond enthusiasts or those with a penchant for exclusive jewellery.

  1. Amethyst

Features:

  • Most popular purple stone
  • Abundantly found
  • Affordable
  • Good hardness
  • Not very tough

Amethysts are the most well-known purple gemstones.  In the past, amethysts were considered a cardinal gemstone (gemstones considered precious above all others) and on equal par with diamonds, sapphires, rubies and emeralds. However, when large deposits were found in Brazil, the value of amethysts dropped making it an affordable gemstone that suits almost all budgets.

Amethysts come in all shades of purple, with those displaying the deepest purple hues considered the best. Amethysts are durable enough for use in all types of jewellery (7 Mohs) but requires reasonable care to maintain its lustre and colour. They can easily get scratched and due to their brittleness, can chip or crack when exposed to rough wear. The colour of amethysts can also fade if exposed to direct light for too long. However, if maintained well, amethyst jewellery can last a lifetime.

  1. Purple Chalcedony

Features:

  • Quite durable
  • Vitreous – waxy lustre
  • Relatively affordable

Purple chalcedony comes in beautiful shades of purple from a light lilac to dark purple. Purple chalcedony is usually translucent to opaque, with a vitreous to waxy lustre. It has a very appealing look with a rich natural colour.

Chalcedony has a microcrystalline structure without crystal formations within it. As a result, it is compact, contains no cleavage and is very durable. Purple chalcedony is a tough stone with medium hardness (6.5 to 7 Mohs). Most chalcedony is cut en cabochon or used in beautiful carvings and engravings. However, sometimes these stones are faceted to add more depth and light play to the piece of jewellery. Chalcedony jewellery is ideal for bohemian and ethnic jewellery designs.

  1. Purple Spinel

Features:

  • Very durable
  • Somewhat rare
  • Relatively affordable
  • Very brilliant

Purple spinel comes in a variety of shades, with lilac and mauve considered more attractive. However, it is not as valuable or sought-after as red and blue spinel. Purple spinel is relatively affordable and a durable gemstone (Mohs 8) suited for every day wear. It is a brilliant gemstone and due to this fact, is often cut into faceted gemstone shapes to enhance the brilliance. Purple spinel has been synthesized but it is rarely enhanced or treated, meaning that the colour you see in a purple spinel stone is likely to be natural.

  1. Iolite

Features:

  • Popular
  • Very abundant
  • Not expensive
  • Good brilliance
  • Not highly durable

Although iolites are highly sought-after gemstones, they are quite stunning and can rival the beauty of more expensive blue stones such as sapphire or tanzanite. It is a highly brilliant stone that occurs in blue-purple shades, but due to its abundance, it is not highly valued. Iolite has distinct cleavage making it susceptible to chipping or cracking if struck with force. However, it has fairly good hardness (7 to 7.5 Mohs) and can be used in almost all types of jewellery. When mounted in rings, it is best to set iolite in protective settings such as bezel or halo. Beautifully faceted iolite sparkles with eye-catching brilliance. Iolite is perfect for jewellery where it is able to catch light, such as on a ring or in dangling earrings.

  1. Purple Jade

Features:

  • Fair hardness
  • Very tough
  • Comes in two varieties
  • Waxy lustre

Most people think of green when they say the word jade, but jade occurs in a range of colours, including beautiful purple shades. There are two varieties of jade: nephrite and jadeite. Nephrite is more abundant and less expensive, while jadeite is considered of better quality and is pricier.

Purple jade is fairly soft (6 Mohs) but is very tough due to its compact composition. Purple jade is found in translucent to opaque varieties and has a smooth, waxy lustre. Most jade is often cut into cabochons or various special smooth cuts or carved. Faceting jade is less common but can give the gemstone added depth.

  1. Purple Sapphire

Features:

  • Uncommon sapphire colour
  • Often untreated
  • Excellent durability
  • Quite rare

Say sapphire and we think of a vivid blue gemstone. But there is such a thing as purple sapphire which is rarer and as beautiful as its blue counterparts. This colour occurs traces of elements such as chromium is present during the sapphire’s formation. Many people sometimes confuse purple sapphires for amethysts, but purple sapphires are a more durable and hard (Mohs 9) gemstone, second only to diamonds but with better toughness. They are extremely resistant to breakage and chipping.

While most other sapphires on the market are heat treated to enhance colour and clarity, purple sapphires are generally not treated because they have very good natural colouring. Because of their brilliance and durability, these sapphires are an excellent choice if you want a purple gemstone for an everyday piece of jewellery, such as an engagement ring.

  1. Purple Fluorite

Features:

  • Low durability
  • Very rare
  • Vitreous lustre
  • Often transparent

Fluorite is a very popular variety of gemstones among collectors but is not commonly used in jewellery due to its low durability. The quintessential fluorite colour is purple, but it occurs in every colour imaginable. While most purple fluorite occurs in a single colour, there is a purple and white banded variety known as Blue John.

High quality purple fluorite should have very good transparency and be eye-clean. Fluorite has a beautiful vitreous lustre and can be cut into most standard gemstone shapes. However, fluorite is very soft (Mohs 4) and has distinct cleavage. It is not suitable for most types of jewellery, especially those that are likely to have high exposure. However, it can be used in jewellery such as pendants and earrings.

  1. Purple Kunzite

Features:

  • Exhibits pleochroism
  • Good clarity
  • Light to vivid hues
  • Affordable
  • Distinct cleavage

Kunzite is little-known beautiful gemstone that occurs in pink to purple shades. The gem was first discovered in the USA but today most kunzite comes from Pakistan and Afghanistan. Most purple kunzite is quite light in colour but some stones can have a vivid and intense hue. Kunzite can also exhibit pleochroism, which refers to its ability to exhibit two colours at the same time depending on the angle it is viewed from. Typically, the two colours are pink and purple or colourless. Kunzite is also generally free of inclusions and has very good transparency. You can find kunzite in a range of fancy shapes, although smooth polished cabochons are also common.

Most kunzite on the market is free of treatments or enhancements. Kunzite is a fairly durable stone (6.5 to 7 Mohs) can be used for most types of jewellery. However, as it has very distinct cleavage, it is prone to breakage and needs to be protected from impact and blows. Kunzite remains a very affordable stone and because it is found in large sizes, it is perfect for large statement jewellery.

10. Purple Tourmaline

Features:

  • Not a popular tourmaline colour
  • Very good durability
  • Vitreous lustre
  • Brilliant

Purple tourmaline is not the most popular tourmaline colour but is beautiful when set in jewellery. They come in a range of purple shades and can be quite affordable. All coloured tourmaline exhibits some form of pleochroism. This makes tourmaline a dynamic and vibrant gemstone for jewellery, especially when viewed from different angles under lights.

Most purple tourmalines are faceted to enhance the stone’s brilliance and pleochroism (if noticeable). Purple tourmaline has good durability (7 to 7.5 Mohs) and with reasonable care can last a very long time.  Heat treatment is commonly carried out on tourmalines to enhance their colour, however, your vendor should let you know if such treatments have been done on your stone.

11. Sugilite

Features:

  • Very rare
  • Uncommon in jewellery
  • Opaque to translucent clarity
  • Contains patterns, patches and veins
  • Medium durability

Sugilite was initially discovered in Japan and is categorized as a rare gemstone. Small deposits of sugilite have been found in other regions but these are not abundant. As a result, it is not a mainstream gemstone and there aren’t many options when it comes to sugilite jewellery.

Sugilite is found from faint pink-purple varieties to dark blue-purple. However, the most valuable and sought-after sugilite colour is an evenly saturated vivid purple hue. Sugilite is often opaque to translucent and most contain dark veins or patches that form interesting patterns on its surface.  It is commonly cut en cabochon or carved into intricate and beautiful designs, although translucent sugilite can be faceted for added depth and light play. Sugilite is rarely enhanced or treated. It is not a very durable gemstone (5.5 to 6.5 Mohs) and can easily get damaged.

12. Purple Jasper

Features:

  • Commonly found
  • Opaque to translucent clarity
  • Contains patterns, matrix and veins
  • Medium hardness
  • Very tough

Jasper is commonly red, but it can also be found in purple shades. It is a variety of chalcedony, a type of quartz. Jasper often has interesting matrix inclusions and patterns that add character to the stone and are quite desirable. Most jasper is translucent to opaque in clarity and is often cut en cabochon or carved. Jasper is rarely faceted.

With a hardness of 6.5 to 7 on the Mohs scale and very good toughness due to its compact nature, jasper jewellery can last a very long time without damage. As it is relatively affordable, it is an ideal gemstone for costume jewellery and statement pieces.

Some other purple gemstones

Here are some purple gemstones that we have not included in our list of top 12 purple gemstones.

  • Charoite– This gemstone varies in colour from lilac to deep purple. It is a somewhat soft, translucent gemstone that is found only in Siberia and is quite rare.
  • Purple Agate – Agate can be found in all colours in banded and single colour varieties. Purple agate typically comes from Botswana and Brazil.
  • Purple Lepidolite – This beautiful gemstone has a vitreous lustre and is transparent to translucent in clarity. However it is very soft (2.5 to 33 Mohs) and not very suitable for jewellery.
  • Purple Scapolite – Transparent with a vitreous lustre, scapolite is a sparkly gemstone with medium hardness. It is quite a rare gemstone and is sought-after by collector’s and mineral enthusiasts.

Purple Gemstones and Metals

Purple gemstones go well with all metal colours, which is a factor that determines the style of the jewellery. For example, white metals such as platinum, silver or white gold give a contemporary look to purple gemstones, making them stand out in contrast. An amethyst in a white gold setting, for example, appears prominent and to full advantage.

Rose and yellow gold settings offer a unique, vintage look when combined with purple gemstones. These are more classical in appearance and are not very commonly chosen combinations.

Symbolism of Purple in Jewellery

Purple is a combination of red and blue, which are the warmest and coolest colours. As such, it combines the fierce energy of red with the calming, soothing vibes of blue for a balancing, harmonious feel.

Purple has been connected to royalty and the upper echelons since ancient times, with history stating that Queen Elizabeth the First only allowing members of the royal family to wear it. It is also a rare colour in nature, giving purple gemstones that extra allure.

Health benefits of wearing Silver Jewellery…….

Since ancient times, human beings have sought healing properties in gemstones and minerals. From the just-for-fun aspect of mood rings to amulets designed to ward off certain dangers, it’s not hard to find jewellery purporting mystical powers.

From Native American turquoise to alchemy miracles, there’s a long history of belief systems wrapped up in the healing powers of gems and metals. Indeed, royals originally wore gem-studded crowns not only as symbols of wealth and power, but also as protection against ills and evil.

So, what benefits, if any, can any jewellery truly hold? Studies are inconclusive and much is linked to the power of belief and mental suggestion, but there are distinct health benefits to wearing silver jewellery.

Sterling silver jewellery due to a combination of price, value, and appearance. But its benefits extend beyond affordability and aesthetics.

What Are The Benefits of Silver Jewellery?

As a metal, silver has significant health benefits that have been used across cultures for centuries. Silver has a proven track record as a powerful antimicrobial agent fighting infections and aiding in cold and flu prevention, wound healing, and more. Silver also helps with internal heat regulation and circulation. Many have reported improvements in energy levels and balance in moods after wearing silver,  as its natural properties may offset outside electrical disturbances, improve circulation and overall body temperature balance, and help maintain cleanliness and immunity.

Silver has a long history in antibiotics and sterilization, with many women and men wearing silver jewellery to stave off infection, cold/flu symptoms, and any other virus, bacteria, etc. Silver also purportedly keeps our blood vessels elastic, which enables it to play a role in bone formation and healing, as well as skin maintenance and repair. Finally, silver has a directly tangible benefit in helping us to avoid potentially toxic substances — as a metal, silver reacts and turns colour when it encounters many other chemicals that are known toxins.

Some people even go beyond silver jewellery to wear silver-lined sleep masks to improve their night’s rest or silver-lined gloves to wear while typing on a laptop to disrupt the transmission of electronic signals from technology into the body.

The Science behind Silver

This may sound like a lot of mumbo jumbo to some, but silver has a distinctly scientific basis for its health benefits derived from its electrical and thermal conductivity. Positively-charged silver ions create a conductive field that reflects electromagnetic radiation away from the body, which stimulates the body’s natural conductivity and improves blood circulation, body temperature balance, and general well-being. Positively charged silver ions also bind to negatively charged oxygen receptors in bacteria, which is why silver can fight against harmful infection and disease.

For those that are sceptical, consider that researchers of the University of Southampton have proven that wearing a specific type of silver ring can help alleviate some symptoms of arthritis in the hands. The benefits include not only helping to reduce pain, but also preventing hyperextension in the finger joints, which is common in those who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis.

Even for those not willing to buy into the properties of silver as a metal, there is another way to reap health benefits from wearing silver jewellery. In our fast-paced culture, many are turning to meditation, yoga, mindfulness, and other calming techniques to reduce anxiety. Certain types of jewellery can also be worn to help prevent anxiety and re-centre. Simple silver “worry jewellery” and spinner rings, which feature an outer band that spins freely around the inner ring, have been proven to have a calming effect that helps fight anxiety through repetitive motion. Those suffering from anxiety can quietly spin their ring to help combat symptoms even when in a public, crowded space.

Keep In Mind

 One brief word of warning — though silver has many proven (and some unproven) health benefits, there are those who are allergic to silver. For these individuals, wearing silver can have the opposite effect, causing a rash or making your skin change colour. If you suffer from a silver allergy, you’ll want to look elsewhere for health benefits in jewellery.

Whether you believe wholeheartedly in all of silver’s reported benefits or merely enjoy the look of silver and hope it may help with anxiety or another ailment on a smaller scale, there’s no denying that wearing silver jewellery is, potentially, an aesthetically-pleasing way to calm your mind and increase your overall well-being.

 

17 interesting Peridot facts…..

Peridot is the type of birthstone that you either love or hate. Despite the stone’s lime green color and affordability, it is underrated in the fine jewelry market. Keep reading to explore some intriguing peridot facts that may make you appreciate this birthstone even more.

Peridot is a gem-quality form of the mineral olivine. This material is also referred to as chrysolite.

The gem is found primarily among rocks that were created by volcanoes and buried deep underground (igneous rocks), so wherever there are or was volcanoes, this mineral is likely to be found.

Large quantities of peridot are mined from the San Carlos reservation in Arizona as well as in Myanmar (Burma), Sri Lanka, and China. Peridot is also mined in large quantities in many other parts of the world like Pakistan and Kenya. Peridot that is mined in the US is usually much smaller and lighter in color than the varieties from other locales.

Some peridot specimens have been discovered in meteorites, though this finding is very rare.

Peridot Folklore

In Hawaii, peridot symbolizes the tears of Hele who is the goddess of fire and volcanoes.

Romans referred to peridot as “Evening Emerald” because unlike the deep hues of emeralds, peridot gemstones did not darken at night and still shimmered under candlelight.

Legend has it that peridot could ward off evil spirits. It is also thought to aid in the success of marriage and other relationships. This may be because it is thought to encourage positive energy as well as suppress ego and jealousy.

Buying Peridot

Peridot, unlike most other gemstones, only comes in one color, pale green. There is a wide range of green shades that peridot exhibits, however, including olive green, lime green, yellowish green, and dark green. The most desirable shade of peridot is a deeply saturated forest green with a slight yellow tone and no brown tones. This color is more readily found in peridot stones weighing over 10 carats.

There is no synthetic or man-made version of peridot, but imitations do exist. These are usually made of glass or natural tourmaline.

Commercial quality peridot is separated into to quality grades of A and B.  A quality peridot stones are eye clean yellowish green stones with no brown tones. B quality peridot stones are usually very pale in color or have visible inclusions.

Peridot is a relatively inexpensive gemstone under 4 carats. Any stone weighing over 4 carats costs considerably more. Stones over 10 carats are exceedingly rare and therefore expensive.

Peridot is a softer stone that is best set in jewelry that doesn’t see hard wear. Bezel settings that protect the stone are recommended.

Gemstones for Moms: A Mother’s Day Gemstone Gift Guide

With Mother’s Day looming up, now is the perfect time to find this year’s gift. Kaleidogems offers a range of gorgeous jewellery including rings, pendants, earrings, and bracelets. Take a look through our Mother’s Day gift ideas below to find your mom the perfect mother’s day gift:

Choose Her Favorite Gemstone

You can’t go wrong with jewellery featuring your mom’s favorite gemstone. Opt for a single feature piece or buy a jewellery set. We offer almost 80 types of gemstones set in a range of jewellery styles from simple to ornate. Our most popular choices include  amethyst rings, and Lapis Lazuli bracelets.

Jewellery with Her Children’s Birthstones

Why not give her a gift that represents her children on mother’s day? A piece of jewellery containing your birthstone is a fantastic way to give your mom something that she can carry with her to show the bond you share. Here’s a list of the birthstones by month along with jewellery to help you get started:

January – Garnet

February – Amethyst

March – Aquamarine

April – Diamond or CZ

May – Emerald

June – Pearl  / Alexandrite

July – Ruby

August – Peridot  / Spinel

September – Sapphire

October – Tourmaline  / Opal

November – Topaz / Citrine

December – Tanzanite / Zircon  / Turquoise

Give Her Your Heart on Mother’s Day!

Fall back on a classic this mother’s day by giving her a piece of jewellery that will be close to her heart. We offer a selection of beautiful necklace pendants to show your everlasting love.

Don’t Break the Bank

Kaleidogems offers a range of fantastic jewellery for every budget.

Can crystals, minerals and gemstones really heal you?

From Cleopatra to popes, the belief in the healing power of crystals and stones has persisted for centuries, and even modern medicine has weighed in on the matter

Before dismissing it all as hocus pocus, consider how their reputation has persisted for centuries. From Cleopatra to popes, crystals and gemstones have been stitched into robes and cut into amulets for protection, or ground into powders to beautify the complexion and heal wounds and diseases.

Modern medicine has attempted to shed light on the their use. Dr Robert O. Becker, an orthopaedic surgeon and professor who has dedicated his life to researching the regenerative powers within our bodies and its electric currents, documented in his book The Body Electric, that open wounds do emit a certain electric current, and the currents’ intensity determines how quickly one person heals compared to the next. His research has also focused on the purported potential of electric fields in healing bone fractures and heart murmurs. This suggests that our bodies actually do correspond with the energy and vibration levels of crystals and mineral stones, which all possess natural energy fields and properties.

Hong Kong-born, London-based geneticist and biochemist Dr Mae Wan-Ho championed the more radical idea of holistically fusing Western and Eastern medicinal lore in her book The Rainbow and the Worm: The Physics of Organisms, in which she writes about how liquid crystals exist within our ligaments, muscles and tendons and are “chieftains” that connect one point to another in order to enable the body to function properly. If this sounds familiar, it’s because it borrows from the principles of acupuncture.

“Utilising stones as a practice has been done for centuries in Eastern traditions and is something that is now being incorporated into Western medicines,” says Kristin Petrovich, author of Elemental Energy and co-founder of Sjal Skincare.

The US skincare brand fuses Chinese, Tibetan, ayurvedic, homeopathic and vibrational medicines with biotechnology advances in the beauty industry to remedy skin problems. Minerals, gemstones and crystals are believed to contain electro-stimulants that give an extra boost to the concoctions.

“From our perspective this seemed very logical as they possess a higher vibrational level or frequency which we as humans naturally resonate with,” Petrovich says. “We resonate and have an electronic exchange with the Earth as we do with the gemstones and minerals.”

Taryn Toomey, former yoga instructor and founder of calisthenics and plyometrics workout The Class, which she offers in Dubai, Australia and the US, is opening a fitness studio in New York with crystal-encrusted floors and custom-made scents to create an “energetically balanced” environment.

This leads to the heart of what mineral stones are claimed to do, which is heighten your energy fields and lift low vibration levels, none of which can be seen with the naked eye, but are deemed instrumental in causing maladies from fevers to depression. If you have trouble sitting still, sound healing could be for you. Built on the foundation of gongs, sound forks and Tibetan crystal singing bowls, each session is designed to bring peace, simulating a tranquil state similar to that achieved in meditation. Followers claim it has healed sleeping disorders, psychological traumas, and anxiety.

“We can use black stones such as smoky quartz or black tourmaline to protect against negative energy,” says Petrovich. “Malachite and sugilite can act as a shield to help protect against electromagnetic frequencies.”

This is especially relevant in our hyper-connected world. So if you need a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, instead of a cup of coffee, consider this tip from Petrovich: “You can make gemstone elixirs to spray around your office and home. You can even place stones at work and home as well as carry them in your pocket or close to your skin.”

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Rocks and minerals: a healing history

How to Clean Semi-Precious Stones

Pearls, coral, opals, and lapis lazuli are among the gemstones that are considered semi-precious. The term ‘semi-precious’ does not mean that these stones are inferior in quality or value and states that, “…all natural colored stones are rare and precious.” Regular cleaning is part of taking care of semi-precious stones.

Things You’ll Need

  • Soft cloths
  • Mild liquid detergent
  • Soft, non-metallic brush

Opaque Gemstones

Clean opaque stones, such as opals, lapis lazuli, jade, turquoise and malachite, by wiping them with a moist cloth after each wearing. Avoid exposing these stones to soap and water; according to the International Colored Gemstone Association, these gemstones are basically rock-and not crystals from a single mineral-and could absorb the water and soap.

Clean organic gemstones like pearls, coral and amber by wiping them with a soft cloth after each wearing to remove dust and body oils from the gemstones. Protect them from exposure to hairspray, perfume or cosmetics, as the chemicals in these products can damage organic gemstones over time.

Protect opaque semi-precious gemstones by storing them in individual sections of a jewelry box, or in fabric pouches or wrapping them in pieces of soft fabric. This will prevent them from being scratched.

Transparent Gemstones

Clean transparent semi-precious gemstones. Fill a container-not the sink to avoid accidentally losing the jewelry down the drain-and put a tiny amount of mild liquid soap in the water. Place the gemstones in the soapy water and allow them to soak.

Use a soft, non-metallic brush to brush the gemstone. Be careful not to brush vigorously as it could loosen settings.

Rinse the jewelry thoroughly under running water and lay it on a soft cloth to dry.

Separate gemstones from touching each other to prevent scratching. This can be done by placing them in separate sections within the jewelry box, using fabric pouches, or wrapping them in separate pieces of soft cloth.

Tips

  • Kaleidogems recommends periodically taking semi-precious gemstones to the jeweller for inspection and thorough cleaning.